Tag Archives: winter

What You Need to Know About Fevers

Cold and flu season is upon us, and with that comes a classic symptom – fever.

There are a lot of things to know about fevers, and we want to share some must have knowledge before your temperature starts rising.

What temperature is considered a fever?
A fever is any temperature above 100.4. A normal body temperature is anywhere between 97 degrees F and 100.3 degrees F.

Is there such a thing as a fever that’s too high?
There are no magic numbers with fevers. A child with a 104.5 degree fever isn’t necessarily sicker than one with a fever of 100.8. What matters most is the duration of the fever and your child’s behavior once the temperature comes down. In addition, if your child has a fever for more than three days we recommend that they see a doctor.

Are fevers dangerous?
Having a fever is your child’s natural response to fighting infection. Though fevers may feel scary, they are not usually dangerous. Remember, there are medications available to help bring down your child’s temperature so they can be more comfortable.

Should babies always receive medicine for fevers?
You do not have to give your child medication just because he/she has a fever. The fever itself is not dangerous. The reason behind giving them medication is to make him/her more comfortable. If your child has a temperature of 101, but is playing, drinking fluids, and running around, then you can wait and see how they do. If the child seems uncomfortable, it is a good idea to give him/her the medicine so they feel better. Acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) can be given every four hours. Ibuprofen (the active ingredient in Advil and Motrin) can be given every 6 hours once your child is over six months of age.

Can fevers give children brain damage?
Having a fever is the body’s physiologic response to fighting infection. Fevers will not “fry” or “melt” your child’s brain. There is a small subset of children who can have seizures with fever; these are referred to as febrile seizures. These events are uncommon and studies have shown many times that fever reducers do not prevent febrile seizures. If your child does have a febrile seizure you should call 911.

When should I seek medical attention?

  • The child is less than 2-months-old and has a rectal temperature greater than 100.4 degrees.
  • He/she has had persistent fevers for more than three days in a row.
  • He/she is very irritable, despite the fever having gone down.
  • He/she is extremely sleepy and you are having difficulty awakening them.
  • He/she is having trouble breathing.
  • You are not sure how to handle the situation (or you feel concerned about your child’s condition).

Remember, treating the fever with a fever reducer will bring down your child’s temperature, but does not take care of the underlying illness. It is likely that once the medication wears off, your child will have a fever again. In most cases, time, fluids, and fever reducers are all they will need to get back to their normal self.

Winter-standing

This blog was repurposed from Premier Pediatrics. For the complete post, click here

BFL – Baby To Go – Tips and tricks for winter with the wee ones

BabytoGoImage

Baby To Go – in the cold!

Do’s & Don’ts for Safe Winter Adventures

The seasons have changed *fast* here in the Northeast, and we are heading into the winter! Just because the temperatures have dropped, that doesn’t mean we all need to stay home, but it’s important to keep our babies safe and warm.

BTG-shower cap car seat

DO – Use layers to bundle.

It is understandable to want to keep our tiny babes as warm as possible when it’s so cold outside, but puffy winter coats can interfere with correct fit of car seat harness straps, and overheating can be more dangerous than a slight chill. Concentrate on the extremities – keep tiny fingers and toes warm with socks and mittens.  Layer a light fleece under a heavier jacket so that the jacket can be removed in the car. A good rule of thumb for babies younger than 12 months is to add one more layer than you are wearing. Be sure to have a warm hat for baby, as most body heat escapes through the head.

DON’T – Use puffy coats or after-market car seat covers that interfere with the harness straps.

Injuries sustained in car accidents are the leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. With that in mind, it is important to minimize risk by using car seats in the safest way possible. Coats with too much bulk make it difficult or impossible to tighten car seat straps correctly, and can make an accident more dangerous. Car seats are not crash tested or designed to be used with after-market accessories, and anything that interferes with the harness straps can reduce the safety. Instead, tuck a blanket around your little one after the harness is safely fitted or look for shower cap style covers that don’t touch the harness straps.

BTG-winterwearing

DO -Use your body heat.

Babywearing has offers incredible benefits to both the parent and baby. In the winter, wearing keeps both of you warmer. Use a maternity coat or a jacket a size or two too large to zip over baby snuggles. There are also many specialty baby wearing coats and jackets available.

DON’T – Overdo it.

Babies, especially younger infants, lack the ability to regulate their own body temperature. Babywearing can help, but your baby will get colder quicker than you. Limit outdoor activities when the temperature drops too low, and take breaks indoors to warm up. Watch for signals that baby is too cold – blue lips, pale nose or fingertips, fussy or lethargic – or overheating – sweaty, flushed cheeks, bumpy rash.

BTG - skiing

- Sarah Ludwig is a stay at home mom who never stays at home. She loves helping families on their path to parenthood, and works as a childbirth educator, doula, and CPST. She is a Babywearing Educator with the local chapter of Babywearing International, and she blogs about her adventures at lovetheludwigs.com.