Tag Archives: sleep

Children Vs. Night Terrors

It’s the middle of the night and your child wakes up calling out your name. You think they are suffering from a nightmare, but then you realize that nothing is working to help console your child. This is because your child is not suffering from a nightmare, but a night terror.

A night terror is different than a nightmare. When night terrors happen, most of the brain is asleep, but the small part that controls a child’s movement, voice, and expression actually remains awake. Because night terrors happen during non-REM sleep, parents can’t wake their child from the episode or console them.

With nightmares, parents can comfort their children by talking to them, hugging them, or turning on a light. Children usually remember nightmares the next morning, unlike night terrors.

To help prevent your child from night terrors, LULLY provides their audience with the Sleep Guardian 2. The Sleep Guardian 2 automatically vibrates to prevent night terrors before they start. It learns about your child’s sleep, and vibrates at just the right time. Then, its smart sensors detect when your child stirs, indicating it’s time to turn off. This means your child stays asleep, and you can too!

All information was gathered by LULLY.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Consultant, Taylor Bell

Meet New York Sleep Coach

It’s time to learn how to sleep train your little ones, and give parents everywhere a life with more sleep.

We had the opportunity to talk with Kylee Sallak, founder of New York Sleep Coach, and the creator of Happy Parents, Happy Child method of sleep training. Read below to find out more about her and the impressive work done by New York Sleep Coach.

Q: What experiences or motivational factors helped lead you to create New York Sleep Coach?

Creating NYSC was a culmination of 16 years of helping families and one big recent ‘ah-ha’ moment with a close friend who wasn’t able to convince her 14 month old to nap. While I have many years of sleep training behind me, it wasn’t solidified that I could create something this acutely helpful until I saw my sleep-deprived friend feeling hopeless with her toddler’s sleep. It was enormously motivating to realize that I can be of service to parents in such a short and transformative period of time. At my core, I am a nurturer and have always found myself needing to care for others. NYSC has given me the privilege to nurture parents, so they can be at their best to nurture their kids.

Q: What are the benefits of hiring a sleep coach for a child?

The primary reason parents choose to work with me is because they have tried on their own and always end up caving in at some early stage of the process out of fear, being too sleepy to keep with it, or a combination of both. Parents report that working with me helped them feel confident in their decision to sleep train and supported during the periods they would have otherwise caved in. I make sure that parents who work with me are getting accurate facts about sleep, support, encouragement and walk away feeling empowered with tools to uphold their decision to sleep train.

A lack of restorative sleep negatively affects your child’s mood, their gross and fine motor development, their appetite, short and long-term cognitive development, and their ability to handle frustration. Fewer tantrums and cheery moods are the outwardly and immediately noticeable perks for your little ones. If your child is sleeping soundly all night, and napping well during the day, you also have the opportunity to be getting quality rest. Uninterrupted time spent with your partner, both in and out of the bedroom, waking up more refreshed, having more patience when are you with your little one(s), and being more productive during your awake hours. These are the notable perks for the parents. And while it may not seem so obvious right now, there is a significant domino effect and implications of not sleep training your child that extends beyond toddler and preschool years into primary school and beyond.

Q: We like your approach on common sense sleep training, can you share a few tips for new parents?

I am happy to share the most commonly missed practices, which are also the most immediately impactful practices you can start using today. So many parents I speak to are doing only 1 or 2 of these tips, and some parents aren’t utilizing any of them. This is usually because they either hadn’t gotten around to trying, or because they didn’t believe these would work for their baby or young child. Either way, I would recommend giving these a try even if you are skeptical. These are going to make a noticeable difference if done consistently. And if you get stuck along the way and feel you need more support, I am here to help parents just like you get over this bump in the road!

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell

Guide to Raising a Happy, Healthy Mom

The Mother’s Matter blog recently posted an article that talks about how to raise a happy, healthy mom. One big influential factor they highlight is sleep (or lack of) amongst moms.

This post offers three tried and tested tips that can help moms and dads catch a few extra zzz’s.

1. Sleep more = Sweat more.

A study published in Annals of Behavioral Medicine, revealed that a home-based, individual aerobic exercise program can reduce fatigue (both physical and mental) in women with postpartum depression. A second study revealed that a group of postnatal women who practiced in-home Pilates, were found to have lower levels of physical and mental fatigue than their non-practicing peers.

2. Wanna sleep? Apply the pressure.

Licensed acupuncturist and owner of Four Flower Wellness in Chicago, Ashley Flores, speaks to the restorative potential of acupressure for new mothers. Instead of using needles, the treatment is administered with the fingers. Flores suggested that applying acupressure to the Pericardium 5, 6, and 7 points (found on the inside of the wrist) can be especially useful before going to sleep.

3. Eat your way to a good sleep.

The foods a new mom opts for can make a difference in helping cope with a chronic case of depleted sleep. Nutritional Consultant, Patricia Daly, BA, DipHE, NT states that one of the best ways to stave off physical and emotional fatigue is to keep blood sugar levels even throughout the day. Complex carbohydrates such as whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and brown rice are preferable to their white counterparts.

For the complete article and to see more from Mother’s Matter, click here.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell

Fussy Babies at Night

Just when you think it’s safe to relax and catch up on your DVR shows, the baby gets fussy and the struggles of putting him/her down to bed begin.

Have you ever wondered why babies freak out at night? Well, thanks to a great article by The Bump, we can start to solve this mysterious question.

Here are some of the reasons the article highlights as to why the baby is acting fussy. And for the full article, click here.

1. Baby is overtired - Just like how you get cranky when you’re tired, so does the baby. To prevent overtiredness, the baby needs to sleep a lot during the day — he/she should have a nap every two to two-and-a-half hours.

2. Baby needs to nurse - Some breastfed babies seem to want to feed constantly in the evenings. It’s okay to nurse the baby in what seems like back-to-back-to-back sessions; breastfed babies are virtually impossible to overfeed. The same can’t be said for formula feeding, so if you’ve just fed the baby a bottle, don’t try to “top him up” to prevent him from fussing.

3. Baby is hypersensitive - Here’s the main reason for the witching hour; the baby is hypersensitive to noises, sensations and activities going on around him/her.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell

What You Need to Know About SIDS

Sorry to be a downer with this article, but we want to make sure everyone is aware of every new parents greatest fear, SIDS.

SIDS is very rare, but such a great fear because we don’t know why it happens. The best way to prevent SIDS is to have your baby sleep on his/her back. Most SIDS cases happen between one to four months, with 90% of all cases happening before six months of age.

 Ways to prevent SIDS:

1. Have the baby sleep on his/her back
2. Sleep in the same room (not bed) as baby
3. Be firm about baby’s sleep spot
4. Choose baby’s bedding carefully
5. Keep baby from overheating
6. Breastfeed as much and for as long as you can
7. Stick to your doctor’s schedule
8. Avoid smoke
9. Offer a pacifier
10. Avoid baby sleeping in a car seat, swing, or stroller for long periods of time

The data for this article was from The Bump.com.

 

Written by our CEO & Founder, Lindsay Bell

The Four Month Sleep Regression

My just then turned four month old was ‘the man’ when it came to sleeping through the night. Since he reached three months old he was sleeping 7-8 hours at a time. Then, it was time for him to move to his big boy bedroom and transition from rock n’ play to the crib.

He took to the crib after a few days, but then suddenly he started waking up every 2-3 hours. WHAT?!?!

Apparently, this is what experts call the “four month sleep regression.” This article from Alpha Mom is spot on with my experience!

The four month sleep regression can start as early as three months or as late as five (or even six) months. It happens for a bunch of reasons:

1) A simultaneous growth and developmental spurt.

2) Changes in sleep patterns — around four months a baby’s sleep gets more like ours.

3) Changes in sleep needs — as if there wasn’t enough going on, the baby is probably in the middle of a nap transition, too. This means they are close to eliminating one.

My son is now five months old and worked his way out of the regression – it lasted about a week. Heads up to all of those new moms out there!

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Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell

Nap Schedules and Bedtimes for All Ages

Are you uncertain if your baby or toddler is on track with the number of hours he/she sleeps each day? Is your baby’s bedtime normal?  When will your child sleep through the night?

Checkout these age-by-age charts that are helpful to see where you are now, and where you need to be next. It also includes a printable PDF and resources to get you help!

And if you are looking to compare, here is a sleep chart from Parents Magazine, which offers a quick and to the point guide.

Once you have the norms from these two sources, read up on Parents Magazine’s, “10 Steps to Sleep Training Success.”

Happy sleeping!

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Written by our Social Media & Marketing Coordinator, Taylor Bell