Tag Archives: parenting

Simple Seven List of Parenting Go-To’s

Bell Family gets a lot of parenting tips, newsletters, event invites, must have product pushes… you name it, it has been thrown at us on a daily basis. As we are sure you like to stay informed (just not over informed), we pulled together a simple seven list of mom groups and newsletter sites that we have found helpful in staying updated with city pregnancy and parenting.

Checkout our list below, and let us know if you have any additions that you love!

Our simple seven list of parenting go-to’s:

1. Cardamom: It’s free to download the app, and you can see local moms to meet up for a playdate.
2. Upper East Side Moms (Facebook page): This is a free group to post anything related to motherhood.
3. Manhattan Mamas Meet Up (e-mail list): You can sign up here.
4. Working Moms of Manhattan Group: You can sign up here.
5. Stroller Traffic: A good site for city moms and newsletters.
6. Big City Moms: Started by two sisters and NYC moms, Big City Moms offers a lot of good events and meet-ups.
7. Well Rounded NYC: Offers urban parenting and modern pregnancy. I like their newsletter!

Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell

Get to Know Maternity Mentors

Maternity Mentors is a program designed to help parents navigate life’s greatest challenge through tailored sessions, e-communications, and classes to help mentor new parents.

We recently had the opportunity to talk to Millie Gillon, the face and creator behind Maternity Mentors. Read below to learn more about her and the impressive guidance offered by Maternity Mentors.

Q: You mentioned you spent countless hours researching online boards, articles, mom’s groups, medical journals, etc. What resources helped you the most to answer your new mom questions?

A: CDC, American Medical Association, and combining information from countless blogs, boards, and articles around topics ranging from postpartum care, cloth diapers, to first foods, educational development, and beyond. I feel like I earned a PhD. in new parenthood from all of the research I did during late night nursing sessions. 

Q: Why should moms turn to Maternity Mentors as a trusted resource? What sets you apart from an expecting mom’s network?

A: Maternity Mentors is an experienced resource that works 1 on 1 with expectant moms to deliver the best resource for all maternity issues. The mom’s network is composed of mainly mothers’ first hand accounts, whereas Maternity Mentors is a combination of experiential and clinical resources to help.

Q: Why is having a mentor during pregnancy so important? Does Maternity Mentors stay with the mom throughout the entire pregnancy? Can a mom turn to their mentor after the baby is born?

A: Most new parents are focused on the labor and delivery experience, but few focus on the intricacies of parenthood beyond countless ads focused on buying merchandise that they really do not need. A mother about to go into labor is vulnerable from experience. While there are plenty of resources she can turn to (friends, family), none are directly committed to new parents and the baby/babies. The mentorship experience is about focusing on the new parent(s), and baby’s wellbeing. 

Potty Training Seminar (February 4th)

Do you have, or know anyone who has toddlers ready to be potty trained? If so, you’re in luck because this weekend, NYC Potty Training is hosting a Potty Training Seminar!

The event is hosted by Samantha Allen, founder of NYC Potty Training, who has received great praise from one of our Bell Family moms saying, “She’s incredible! I used her for my son when we were desperate for help and she got him trained in a weekend!”

If you aren’t able to attend the event this weekend, there’s still good news! You can have Samantha Allen (founder), speak to families at your child’s school about methods and strategies for seamless potty training in 1-2 days. Samantha is also available to speak at private events.

If you are interested in attending the event, you can purchase tickets here, but hurry because the event has been sold out the last two years!

3rd Annual Seminar by NYC Potty Training
Leman Manhattan Preparatory School
Saturday, February 4, 2017 from 10AM-11AM (ET)
New York, NY

Potty

Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell

Pre-Baby On Call Services

How our on-call services work is we would typically set aside a 1-2 week window for the sitter to be on call around the expecting moms due date. You would then pay the sitter a day rate for all dates she is on call, and then pay her hourly for the date(s) she will be caring for your other children.

We will just need to know the approximate due date and we can begin to schedule around that time.

You will only need to pay for the dates your sitter is on call. If you book dates and you go into labor, just let us know and we’ll cancel the remaining dates. We do have a 24-hour cancellation policy, so if you cancel a sitter’s appointment with less than 24 hours notice you will be charged a $50 cancellation fee. If it is more than 24 hours notice there is no fee.

The family should also provide cab fare to get the sitter home in case of emergency.

Costs

- $75/day that the sitter is on call
- $30/hr when the sitter is with the other 1-2 children (member family rate is less per hour)
- Cab fare before 7am and after 9pm

Contact us today for more information!

What You Need to Know About SIDS

Sorry to be a downer with this article, but we want to make sure everyone is aware of every new parents greatest fear, SIDS.

SIDS is very rare, but such a great fear because we don’t know why it happens. The best way to prevent SIDS is to have your baby sleep on his/her back. Most SIDS cases happen between one to four months, with 90% of all cases happening before six months of age.

 Ways to prevent SIDS:

1. Have the baby sleep on his/her back
2. Sleep in the same room (not bed) as baby
3. Be firm about baby’s sleep spot
4. Choose baby’s bedding carefully
5. Keep baby from overheating
6. Breastfeed as much and for as long as you can
7. Stick to your doctor’s schedule
8. Avoid smoke
9. Offer a pacifier
10. Avoid baby sleeping in a car seat, swing, or stroller for long periods of time

The data for this article was from The Bump.com.

 

Written by our CEO & Founder, Lindsay Bell

The Four Month Sleep Regression

My just then turned four month old was ‘the man’ when it came to sleeping through the night. Since he reached three months old he was sleeping 7-8 hours at a time. Then, it was time for him to move to his big boy bedroom and transition from rock n’ play to the crib.

He took to the crib after a few days, but then suddenly he started waking up every 2-3 hours. WHAT?!?!

Apparently, this is what experts call the “four month sleep regression.” This article from Alpha Mom is spot on with my experience!

The four month sleep regression can start as early as three months or as late as five (or even six) months. It happens for a bunch of reasons:

1) A simultaneous growth and developmental spurt.

2) Changes in sleep patterns — around four months a baby’s sleep gets more like ours.

3) Changes in sleep needs — as if there wasn’t enough going on, the baby is probably in the middle of a nap transition, too. This means they are close to eliminating one.

My son is now five months old and worked his way out of the regression – it lasted about a week. Heads up to all of those new moms out there!

Carseat

Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell

New York Post Feat. Baby Nurses

Many entrepreneur working moms are finding it near impossible to juggle motherhood and business. Both require you 24/7. The only answer is to outsource to make life manageable. One of the many things moms juggle is sleep at night. Sleep is necessary for mom and baby to thrive, yet it is not easy, especially in the first few months.

One solution is for moms to hire a baby nurse or night nurse. A Baby Nurse is a non-medical professional who comes into the home when the baby comes home from the hospital. They generally assist parents with the day-to-day care of their new baby for a few weeks up to several months. They can provide overnight (10-12 hours), daytime hours, and 24-hour care. A Baby Nurse is experienced, trained, and/or has a certification. Many Baby Nurses will have additional certifications like: HHAs, CNAs or LPNs. Most Baby Nurses also have their CPR certification.

A Night Nurse is an infant expert and only stays at night with the baby. The Night Nurse helps with feedings at night by either bringing the baby to mom, or feeding the baby formula or breast milk through a bottle. Typically, night nurses stat over night from 9-10 p.m. to 6-7 a.m.

Check out this great NY Post article featuring Bell Family Company, and why they agree Baby Nurses are a must have for working moms.

NY Post

Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell

Keeping Kids Hydrated

In a recent article published by Parents.com, they spoke about how to keep kids hydrated during the heat of the summer.

Hydration for the little ones is very important in order for the fluids to be replaced in their bodies that are being sweated out. Ensuring they have plenty of liquids will keep them healthy and active this summer, and help them develop good hydration habits as they grow older.

Try these methods below:

1. For a Long Day. If you have a strenuous day ahead, add some extra hydration with your child’s first meal. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends drinking the equivalent of a standard bottle of water (16.9 oz.) about two hours before vigorous exercise.

2. Don’t Wait. Don’t wait until your child is thirsty to offer refreshment; by that time they are already dehydrated.

3. Six Glasses. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children drink six glasses of water on an average day.

4. Frozen Bottles. When you pack a cooler for a game, freeze a number of water bottles ahead of time. The frozen bottles will keep the others cool and you will be able to pack more drinks in the cooler instead of filling the cooler with ice.

5. Flavor Wins. Studies have shown that children routinely prefer flavored beverages to plain water and will drink up to 90 percent more when it is offered to them.

6. These Don’t Win. Avoid those drinks that have caffeine, such as iced tea or many sodas. As a diuretic, caffeine can contribute to the dehydration process by increasing fluid loss.

7. Fun Hydration. Offer a popsicle to get kids to jump at the chance for a rest period. These frozen treats have high water content (a two-stick Popsicle has just about the right amount for a young child’s needs).

For the full article on Parents.com, click here.

Popcicle

Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell

Top Five Tips for Bathing Your Baby

Before you head out into the world, you may decide your baby needs a bath. Believe it or not, babies only need two or three baths a week during their first year. More frequent baths can dry their skin and cause irritation. For the first few weeks, sponge baths are in order. Once remnants of your baby’s umbilical cord fall off—within one to four weeks—and circumcision heals, you can start bathing your baby in a tub.

Here are our top five tips for bathing your baby:

  1. Be sure the room is warm. If necessary, turn up the heat before bath time.
  2. Have what you need within reach. This includes: soft washcloth; mild, unscented baby soap and shampoo; soft brush to clean the scalp; towels (have extra for unexpected needs); an infant tub; a changing pad or clean flat surface; and a clean diaper and clothes.
  3. Fill tub with a few inches of warm (not hot) water. Test the water temperature with your elbow. Add a few squirts of baby wash.
  4. Gently lower your baby into the water, supporting the head and neck gently. Never let go of an infant in the tub. Using your other hand, begin gently washing. Rinse carefully, protecting baby’s eyes from soap.
  5. Wrap your baby securely in a warm towel, making sure to cover your baby’s head.

 

Bath

Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell!

To Pacifier or Not to Pacifier

During our recent trip to Cleveland to visit my family, my husband was holding our son when the paci fell to the ground. My husband picked it up, stuck it in his mouth; sucked it and then put it in our baby’s mouth. Gross, I snapped in front of everyone (whoops)!

I know there are articles claiming this is good for the baby, but I just don’t like the idea after my husband throws back a coffee or a beer and then puts those tastes, smells, and germs in our baby’s clean mouth.

When I used to babysit, I remember dads doing this first thing in the morning with their coffee breath, and then it would smell the baby’s mouth.

I’m all about our baby being exposed to society. He’s traveled across five states, been held by friends, and has served as my sidekick to brunches, park visits, and grocery store runs. Somehow, none of these things compare to the exposure of a paci that’s been in mine or my husband’s mouth.

Here’s the article about parent germs providing helpful antibodies to the baby. There are studies to support that babies exposed to these antibodies have less allergies, eczema, etc.

Tell me what you think!

Cuddle
Written by our Founder & CEO, and new mom, Lindsay Bell!