Tag Archives: parenting

Keeping Kids Hydrated

In a recent article published by Parents.com, they spoke about how to keep kids hydrated during the heat of the summer.

Hydration for the little ones is very important in order for the fluids to be replaced in their bodies that are being sweated out. Ensuring they have plenty of liquids will keep them healthy and active this summer, and help them develop good hydration habits as they grow older.

Try these methods below:

1. For a Long Day. If you have a strenuous day ahead, add some extra hydration with your child’s first meal. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends drinking the equivalent of a standard bottle of water (16.9 oz.) about two hours before vigorous exercise.

2. Don’t Wait. Don’t wait until your child is thirsty to offer refreshment; by that time they are already dehydrated.

3. Six Glasses. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children drink six glasses of water on an average day.

4. Frozen Bottles. When you pack a cooler for a game, freeze a number of water bottles ahead of time. The frozen bottles will keep the others cool and you will be able to pack more drinks in the cooler instead of filling the cooler with ice.

5. Flavor Wins. Studies have shown that children routinely prefer flavored beverages to plain water and will drink up to 90 percent more when it is offered to them.

6. These Don’t Win. Avoid those drinks that have caffeine, such as iced tea or many sodas. As a diuretic, caffeine can contribute to the dehydration process by increasing fluid loss.

7. Fun Hydration. Offer a popsicle to get kids to jump at the chance for a rest period. These frozen treats have high water content (a two-stick Popsicle has just about the right amount for a young child’s needs).

For the full article on Parents.com, click here.

Popcicle

Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell

Top Five Tips for Bathing Your Baby

Before you head out into the world, you may decide your baby needs a bath. Believe it or not, babies only need two or three baths a week during their first year. More frequent baths can dry their skin and cause irritation. For the first few weeks, sponge baths are in order. Once remnants of your baby’s umbilical cord fall off—within one to four weeks—and circumcision heals, you can start bathing your baby in a tub.

Here are our top five tips for bathing your baby:

  1. Be sure the room is warm. If necessary, turn up the heat before bath time.
  2. Have what you need within reach. This includes: soft washcloth; mild, unscented baby soap and shampoo; soft brush to clean the scalp; towels (have extra for unexpected needs); an infant tub; a changing pad or clean flat surface; and a clean diaper and clothes.
  3. Fill tub with a few inches of warm (not hot) water. Test the water temperature with your elbow. Add a few squirts of baby wash.
  4. Gently lower your baby into the water, supporting the head and neck gently. Never let go of an infant in the tub. Using your other hand, begin gently washing. Rinse carefully, protecting baby’s eyes from soap.
  5. Wrap your baby securely in a warm towel, making sure to cover your baby’s head.

 

Bath

Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell!

To Pacifier or Not to Pacifier

During our recent trip to Cleveland to visit my family, my husband was holding our son when the paci fell to the ground. My husband picked it up, stuck it in his mouth; sucked it and then put it in our baby’s mouth. Gross, I snapped in front of everyone (whoops)!

I know there are articles claiming this is good for the baby, but I just don’t like the idea after my husband throws back a coffee or a beer and then puts those tastes, smells, and germs in our baby’s clean mouth.

When I used to babysit, I remember dads doing this first thing in the morning with their coffee breath, and then it would smell the baby’s mouth.

I’m all about our baby being exposed to society. He’s traveled across five states, been held by friends, and has served as my sidekick to brunches, park visits, and grocery store runs. Somehow, none of these things compare to the exposure of a paci that’s been in mine or my husband’s mouth.

Here’s the article about parent germs providing helpful antibodies to the baby. There are studies to support that babies exposed to these antibodies have less allergies, eczema, etc.

Tell me what you think!

Cuddle
Written by our Founder & CEO, and new mom, Lindsay Bell!

Teenagers, Screentime, and Social Engagement

Worried about your child’s screentime? A new report on “Teens, Technology and Friendships” from the Pew Foundation puts an unusually positive spin on teenagers’ online engagement.

The report found that young adults build friendships and connections online, by both strengthening connections with real-world friends, and by connecting with new friends via social media, video gaming, and messaging apps. 

The associate director of research at the PEW center even noted “What we found is that it’s crucial for teenagers in forming and maintaining these really important relationships in their lives.” So rest easy, parents; it turns out your child’s screentime might not be quite as bad for them as we originally thought.

You can read more about the study on The New York Times’ blog, Motherlode here.