BFL – Baby To Go – Tips and tricks for winter with the wee ones


Baby To Go – in the cold!

Do’s & Don’ts for Safe Winter Adventures

The seasons have changed *fast* here in the Northeast, and we are heading into the winter! Just because the temperatures have dropped, that doesn’t mean we all need to stay home, but it’s important to keep our babies safe and warm.

BTG-shower cap car seat

DO – Use layers to bundle.

It is understandable to want to keep our tiny babes as warm as possible when it’s so cold outside, but puffy winter coats can interfere with correct fit of car seat harness straps, and overheating can be more dangerous than a slight chill. Concentrate on the extremities – keep tiny fingers and toes warm with socks and mittens.  Layer a light fleece under a heavier jacket so that the jacket can be removed in the car. A good rule of thumb for babies younger than 12 months is to add one more layer than you are wearing. Be sure to have a warm hat for baby, as most body heat escapes through the head.

DON’T – Use puffy coats or after-market car seat covers that interfere with the harness straps.

Injuries sustained in car accidents are the leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. With that in mind, it is important to minimize risk by using car seats in the safest way possible. Coats with too much bulk make it difficult or impossible to tighten car seat straps correctly, and can make an accident more dangerous. Car seats are not crash tested or designed to be used with after-market accessories, and anything that interferes with the harness straps can reduce the safety. Instead, tuck a blanket around your little one after the harness is safely fitted or look for shower cap style covers that don’t touch the harness straps.


DO -Use your body heat.

Babywearing has offers incredible benefits to both the parent and baby. In the winter, wearing keeps both of you warmer. Use a maternity coat or a jacket a size or two too large to zip over baby snuggles. There are also many specialty baby wearing coats and jackets available.

DON’T – Overdo it.

Babies, especially younger infants, lack the ability to regulate their own body temperature. Babywearing can help, but your baby will get colder quicker than you. Limit outdoor activities when the temperature drops too low, and take breaks indoors to warm up. Watch for signals that baby is too cold – blue lips, pale nose or fingertips, fussy or lethargic – or overheating – sweaty, flushed cheeks, bumpy rash.

BTG - skiing

- Sarah Ludwig is a stay at home mom who never stays at home. She loves helping families on their path to parenthood, and works as a childbirth educator, doula, and CPST. She is a Babywearing Educator with the local chapter of Babywearing International, and she blogs about her adventures at

BFF – Ahhhh Arbonne

Last weekend I had the pleasure of doing a three day, trial with the Arbonne facial kit. Arbonne is a one of a kind skin care and wellness line for women that provides a chemical free anti-aging kit. In a study conducted by, they discovered that women apply an average of 515 chemicals a day to their skin. Makeup, perfumes, lotions, mascara, and other beauty products all contribute to the toxic brew that can cause health problems for women.

Arbonne photo

My experience with the Arbonne anti-aging kit was excellent. After the second day of using the product my skin felt fresh and radiant. By the third day I could noticeably tell the difference in my skin, I saw improvement in moisture, clarity, and blotchiness. I enjoyed all of the products in the process which takes less than 3 minutes to complete but my favorite product had to be the Corrective eye Serum, it made my eyes look fresh, and awake. This is a great gift for the holidays, and I recommend this for women of all ages! For more information, please contact and receive 35% off your first purchase.

- Hannah, BFC Sitter Coordinator and resident beauty guinea pig

WWW – Accidental SAHM

We have a new contributor to the BFC blog – Jeanne Oh, pastry chef extraordinaire at some of NYC’s renowned restaurants, and now SAH Mom of 7 month old Kermit, living in the West Village with her hubby…….

I am an organized planner.  I have a healthy respect for deadlines and guidelines. While I was a student in college and in pursuit of three post graduate degrees, I never missed a class or forgot an assignment.  I assured myself that I could have it all but just not all at the same time.  Just when I thought I had it all figured out, life got in the way and I gained a sense of humor.

My husband, Joe, and I met in August 1997, engaged in December 1999, and married in October 2001.  Today, he shared a quote by Warren Buffett who pontificated that the single most important decision one will make in his life is who he marries.  We both agreed.  For starters, we never knew how difficult and long it would take to have a child and never took conception and pregnancy for granted.  Fortunately, we had each other through the good and bad.

Our little miracle arrived in April 2014.  Kermit is a sweet 7 month old boy whose toothless grin melts our hearts every single time he smiles.  For the first few weeks of his life, I swear I could watch his eyelashes grow for hours on end.  Each day I find the beauty of life’s discovery through his eyes and revel in the goodness of life’s blessing in him.  I cherish every single moment with him.  Our persistence, heartache, and perseverance were a small price to pay in exchange for our son.


Because we waited 10 years for our privilege to parent, I do not want to relinquish any more time child rearing than necessary.   A lot of my friends who are mothers struggled with their decision to continue working, whether part or full time, but I did not.  I never even considered returning to work because I only want to spend time with Kermit.  I recognize it’s a luxury to exercise this option.  I may have not planned staying at home before I was married but I accidentally found my path in life.


BFL – Teaching an Attitude of Gratitude

Thanksgiving has just passed, and of course I am excited about so many things. Holiday from work, vacation to Denver, CO, to see my wonderful old friends, and my first gluten free turkey day dinner!


I get very nostalgic and joyful around this time of year. Like many of us I become aware of how much I love life and others and how I want to spread my wings and give back to my community. And while I’d like to have a smaller waistline, less student loan debt and vets bills, and have more time for yoga, I am aware of just how blessed, lucky and down right thankful I am for all the gifts I have in my life!

Teaching kids about gratitude and thankfulness is a hot topic around the holidays in America and other parts of the world. We participate in food drives to feed the hungry, donate clothes, volunteer at soup kitchens or get involved in other ways of giving to others in our communities and beyond. It feels good to give back, and it feels even better when a child participates in service work and acknowledges their own gifts and want to share with others.

Here are some helpful tips on teaching kids about gratitude and being thankful during the holidays and and throughout the year.

  • Teach simple manners: Please, excuse me, thank you.
  • Sharing is caring and is the foundation of giving to another.
  • Make a gratitude list at the start or end of your day.
  • Play gratitude ping-pong.
  • Create a gratitude art project. Have your child draw a picture of what makes them happy and discuss the connection of happiness to thankfulness and gratitude.
  • Read a book or watch a movie that sends the message of gratitude and appreciation. Then talk about it!
    • The Giving Tree, by Shel Silverstein
    • Small Blessings, by Erica Becker
    • Have you Filled a Bucket Today?,  by Carol McCloud
  • Have a regular conversation about gratitude and giving back!
  • As parents and caregivers the best way we can teach our youngsters is by role modeling.
  • Gratitude starts with respect and acknowledgement of others and having polite manners.
  • Acknowledgment of others and a positive outlook!
  • Teach empathy.
  • Get involved with a community outreach program that support underserved populations.

Have a very Happy Holiday Season!

- Ali Sheppard