Hire Your Nanny Through an Agency!

GTM Payroll Services conducted a survey on the advantages to hiring household staff through an agency. The findings of their household employment survey of families and nannies made it clear that hiring a nanny through an agency, rather than using an online job site, saved time, boosted retention, and reduced the stress and hassles of bringing multiple nannies on board over a short period of time.

A family that hires through an agency instead of an online job site will receive a higher quality nanny, spend less time searching for the right match, and will ultimately find a nanny that they’ll keep longer.

The supposed benefit of using an online job site is having a wider selection of candidates. However, 83% of respondents who used an online job site said that the number of responses from unqualified candidates was one of the biggest drawbacks of going online to find a nanny.

See the full article “Why You Should Hire Your Nanny Through an Agency,” for more information on the survey. Also, see this handy infographic that illustrates the advantages for a family that hires through an agency versus an online job site.

GTM-trim

This blog has been repurposed from GTM Payroll Services Inc.

Stop Using Infant Sleep Positioners

Although devices designed to make bed-sharing safer have become more popular, recent research has sided against such devices.

“The US Food and Drug Administration is reminding parents and caregivers not to put babies in sleep positioners. These products—sometimes also called ‘nests’ or ‘anti-roll’ products—can cause suffocation (a struggle to breathe) that can lead to death,” reads a recently published statement.

There are two styles in particular this relates to. One features raised supports or pillows (called ‘bolsters’) that are attached to each side of a mat, and the second one has a wedge to raise a baby’s head. Both positioners are intended to keep a baby in a specific position while sleeping, and are intended for infants under 6 months old.

The FDA has received reports of babies who were placed on their backs in these positioners, but later found in hazardous positions either within them or next to them. And more tragically, the FDA has received reports of suffocation-related deaths.

Remember, the safest sleep position for a baby is on their back on a firm surface free of any loose bedding, blankets, or stuffed animals.

Baby

This blog has been repurposed from TheBump.com