No Fear in Getting Sick

Greetings, all!

Let’s face it, when it comes to getting sick, we try our best to turn and run in the opposite direction. However, vomiting is not always avoidable. It’s a fear commonly experienced with children of all ages, including my 25-year-old self. But let’s talk about ways to overcome this fear, and how to give your child a positive mind-set when it comes to getting sick.

Through AboutKidsHealth, Patrick J. McGrath, OC, PhD, FRSC, offers some great advice when a client asks the question:

My 11-year-old son had the flu and vomited. He was very upset by this and now is avoiding foods that he thinks might make him vomit. He does not want to hear anything about people being sick or about the foods he avoids. He thinks he is going to vomit often but has only vomited once or twice. What can I do?

Dr. Pat replies with four things one can do to help their son/daughter overcome this phobia.

1. Tell him/her that vomiting and feeling like vomiting are unpleasant, but they protect the body.
2. Downplay his/her concerns about throwing up. He/she isn’t likely to vomit and it won’t hurt them anyway.
3. Insist he/she eat small amounts of their feared foods. How much they eat doesn’t matter. Help him/her face what they are afraid of.
4. Don’t avoid speaking about people being sick or the foods he/she avoids.

Other ideas that us at Bell Family like include:

1. Have your child sleep in a sleeping bag next to your bed to calm him/her that you are near by.
2. Have a pretend pill (candy) and call it the “no getting sick pill” that he/she can take before bedtime.
3. Chart his/her sleep; every night they sleep well they get a star.
4. Eating; make sure he/she eats at night, but try smaller portions before bed so their belly isn’t full and can be more sensitive to anxiety making them feel like they will throw up. 

For the full article on AboutKidsHealth, click here

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

How to Create Your Care Giver Bio

Greetings, all!

Need help creating a bio for your profile? Answer these questions and the write it out in paragraph form. Write it in FIRST person (see ex. below). Add anything that might be relevant and what makes you unique.  Be as concise as you can. LIMIT 200 WORDS MAX.

1. Where are you from?  Where do you live now?

2. How long have you lived in NYC or the surrounding area? Or when are you moving?

3. Did you go to college? Where? What degree/focus?

4.  What are you hobbies?

5. Childcare experience?

6. Youngest to oldest ages you have worked with? Preference?

7. Bilingual? Drive? Swim? Passport? Willing to travel? Can you tutor? What subjects?

8. What type of job are you looking for full-time/part-time/weekends? Live-in/live-out?

9. Are you good at organization, household management, personal assistant, etc.?

10. Experience with pets? Elderly people? Children with special needs? What kind?

11. Certifications? CNA, HHA, CPR/AED first aid? Baby nurse?

Bio Example:

I am originally from Baltimore, MA but currently live in Brooklyn, New York.  In 2009, I graduated with a BA in Psychology from NYU. I am a former swim instructor for the last eight years and have experience working with children with special needs. I have been babysitting for many years and have filled the role as a summer nanny. I’ve worked with kids ages infant to teen and am extremely confident in tutoring. My best subjects are math and science and I have also tutored kids for the SAT.  Additionally, I have office skills and am computer/tech savvy. I also love to cook and play board games.  I have a driver’s licenses and passport. I truly love children and am excited to find a nanny position where I can fully utilize my experience.  

Once completed, please e-mail your bio to: bookings@bellfamilycompany.com in the body of an e-mail or send it as a word doc attachment. If you are a BFC sitter or nanny, please upload it on your profile and let us know when it is complete!

How to Perform CPR

Greetings, all! Are you needing a quick refresher on compressions only CPR? Well, it just so has it that the refresher you are looking for is below!

Note this post was developed and sourced by Bell Family from our training and experience in CPR, First Aid, and Fire Safety through the American Heart Association and from our training with the Fire Department of New York. We also cited trusted blogs for added information. Note this is NOT a training or certification. These are simply helpful tips.

How to perform CPR – Newborn/Infant
Perform CPR if the child is not breathing, has no pulse and has lost consciousness.

1. First do back blows

- If a baby is conscious but can’t cough, cry, or breathe and you believe something is trapped in their airway, carefully position them face up on one forearm, cradling the back of their head with that hand.
- Place the other hand and forearm on their front. The baby is now sandwiched between your forearms.
- Use your thumb and fingers to hold the jaw and turn them over so that they’re facedown along the other forearm. Lower your arm onto your thigh so that the baby’s head is lower than their chest.
- Using the heel of your hand, deliver five firm and distinct back blows between the baby’s shoulder blades to try to dislodge the object. Maintain support of the head and neck by firmly holding their jaw between your thumb and forefinger.
- Next, place your free hand (the one that had been delivering the back blows) on the back of the baby’s head, with your arm along the spine. Carefully turn the baby over while keeping your other hand and forearm on the front.

2. Then do chest thrusts

- Use your thumb and fingers to hold the jaw while sandwiching the baby between your forearms to support their head and neck. Lower your arm that is supporting their back onto your opposite thigh, still keeping the baby’s head lower than the rest of their body.
- Place the pads of two or three fingers in the center of the baby’s chest, just below an imaginary line running between the nipples. To do a chest thrust, push straight down on the chest about 1 1/2 inches. Then allow the chest to come back to its normal position.
- Do five chest thrusts. Keep your fingers in contact with the baby’s breastbone. The chest thrusts should be smooth, not jerky. Repeat back blows and chest thrusts.
- Continue alternating five back blows and five chest thrusts until the object is forced out or the baby starts to cough forcefully, cry, or breathe on their own. If coughing, let them try to cough up the object.
- Repeat the chest compressions and so on, until help arrives.

Child (toddler to approximately 7-8 years old, dependent on weight)
Check for alertness.  Tap the child gently. See if the child moves or makes a noise. Shout, “Are you OK?”

- If there is no response, shout for help. Tell someone to call 911 and get an AED (if available). Do not leave the child alone until you have done CPR for about two minutes.
- Carefully place the child on his/ her back. If there is a chance the child has a spinal injury, two people should move the child to prevent the head and neck from twisting.

1. Perform chest compressions

- Place the heel of one hand on the breastbone — just below the nipples. Make sure your heel is not at the very end of the breastbone.
- Keep your other hand on the child’s forehead, keeping the head tilted back.
- Press down on the child’s chest so that it compresses about 1/3 to 1/2 the depth of the chest.
- Give 30 chest compressions. Each time, let the chest rise completely. These compressions should be FAST and hard with no pausing. Count the 30 compressions quickly.

2.  Open the airway

- Lift up the chin with one hand. At the same time, tilt the head by pushing down on the forehead with the other hand.
- Look, listen, and feel for breathing. Place your ear close to the child’s mouth and nose. Watch for chest movement. Feel for breath on your cheek.
- If the child is not breathing: Cover the child’s mouth tightly with your mouth.  Pinch the nose closed. Keep the chin lifted and head tilted. Give two rescue breaths. Each breath should take about a second and make the chest rise. Continue CPR (30 chest compressions, followed by two breaths, then repeat) for about two minutes.
- After about two minutes of CPR, if the child still does not have normal breathing, coughing, or any movement, leave the child if you are alone and call 911. If an AED for children is available, use it now.
- Repeat rescue breathing and chest compressions until the child recovers or help arrives.

Adult
100 beats per minute. Sing a song that goes along with the pace of the compressions (“Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees or “Let’s Get It Started” by the Black Eyed Peas). 

 

Safety Refreshers
Note this is NOT a training or certification. These are simply helpful tips. 

Newborn and Infant (1 month-1year)

1. Burping

- Hold the baby with their chin near your shoulder. Support the baby with one hand and gently pat/rub their back with the other to soothe them while allowing their body to stretch out with your hand.
- Sit the baby on your lap with one hand, supporting their chin and pat/rub their back.
- Lay the baby at a slight angle (with their head higher than their chest) on your lap facing you; rub their belly to soothe them while they stretch out their body. We advise this method as a last resort after the above two.

2. Choking

- ONLY if you clearly see and can easily extract the item that is obstructing the airway, take it out. DO NOT stick your fingers down the baby’s throat to try and scoop something out (this can shove it farther down).
- If you cannot see the object, don’t try to find it. Start back blows.

3. Changing a diaper

-  A newborn/infant’s diaper should be changed following each feeding, approx. every 2-3 hours. As child gets older, time frame will vary. Consult parent for schedule.
- Be sure that you put the diaper on correctly- not backwards.
- Dispose of used diaper properly. 

Toddler Safety Techniques

- For naps and bedtime: Do not have anything in the crib with them, unless the parent instructs.
- Make sure electrical outlets are covered or inaccessible.
- Always keep one hand on an infant sitting on a high surface, i.e. a changing table to prevent falling.
- If there are stairs in the home, always use a gate.
- Keep your purse and any hazardous household items (electrical cords, medicine, cleaners, art supplies, toiletries etc.) out of a child’s reach.
- Stay with ALL children throughout bath time and never use more than a couple inches of water.
- Always ensure food is broken up into small enough pieces to prevent choking.
- Never administer medicine without the parent’s permission.

Pre K and K Safety Techniques

- Always use a helmet and/or protective pads when appropriate.
- If at a playground, make sure the equipment is age-appropriate for the children you are supervising.
- When crossing the street, choose street corners with crosswalks and make eye contact with drivers prior to crossing in front of them and always hold the child’s hand. Even if they are older, you must guide them across.

Elementary and Up Safety Techniques

- You are their biggest role model. Model safety first! Teach them safety rules for crossing streets, playing at playgrounds, etc.
- Avoid playing on non-impact-absorbing surfaces, like concrete.
- Remove helmets before using playground equipment.
- Keep screen use to a minimum.

1. AED Reminders

-  Don’t use AED near water.
- Don’t use while child is wet or in a bathing suit.

2. First Aid Tips and Tricks

- Carry 1st aid Kit with you- band aids, Kleenex, wipes, etc.
- Don’t give kids medicine without parental permission.
- Always use sunscreen in summer.
- Bring water always.

3. Fire Safety Tips and Tricks

- Make sure the home is installed with fire alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. Change the batteries in all detectors every six months.
- Develop a home escape plan with the children and family in case of an emergency. Have two exit routes available. Do a practice fire drill so the children understand where they are supposed to go (make an activity of it).
- There are two types of apartment buildings, fireproof and non-fireproof:
a) A fireproof building is usually a high-rise, so the building is made of concrete, not wood. If the fire is not in your apartment, it is probably safer to stay inside than to enter a smoke-filled hallway. Keep the door CLOSED, and seal the gaps with duct tape or wet sheets/towels. Open the windows slightly. Call the Fire Department. b) A non-fireproof building is usually an older building, has an exterior fire escape, and is made of wood. If the fire alarm goes off, leave the building immediately.

- Children and toddlers have a curiosity about fire. Make sure they are taught to NEVER play with matches and lighters. If a child expresses curiosity about fire, calmly but firmly explain that matches and lighters are tools, not toys.
- Never leave a child unattended in a room with a lit candle.
- Do not use candles if the power goes out. ONLY use flashlights.
- Never use an extension for large appliances.
- Turn off/unplug all space heaters whenever you leave the room. Do not leave children unattended in rooms with space heaters. Never plug in space heaters into extension cords.
- Using a fire extinguisher for a SMALL fire: 1) Pull the pin, holding the extinguisher upright 2) Aim at the base of the fire, from 20 ft. away 3) Squeeze the handle 4) Sweep from side to side.
- Fire extinguishers can only be used ONCE, and must be replaced or refilled after a use.
- Cooking fires/grease fires should NOT be extinguished with water because it will splash the grease and spread the fire. First, turn off the stove. Then use either baking soda or slide a lid over the pan to smother the flame. Do not attempt to pick up/move the pan, and do not take off the lid before a couple of hours.
- Always stay in the kitchen whenever there is something on the stove. Keep pan handles facing inwards in case a child tries to grab at the handle. Ideally, keep pans on the back burners if the children are around.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

CPR Training Near You

Greetings, all!

Are you in the NYC, Los Angeles, or Chicago areas, and looking to get CPR training? Us at Bell Family did some digging, and here is what we found.

New York

1. Free CPR training through FDNY (Download their “Be 911” free app)

2. HeartStart Training provides certification courses daily that cover infant, child, and adult CPR/AED/First Aid

Los Angeles

1. American Red Cross

2. American Heart Association

Chicago

1. American Red Cross

2. CPR in Chicago (FREE)

3. Chicago Pulse

If you take one of these courses as a BFC prospective sitter, be sure to get proof and send it to our team. Please note, Bell Family does not reimburse for certification or independent training.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

Running with Heels

Greetings, all!

We all know that we live in a world of networking. It’s bold, vast, and apart of our everyday lives. Like most things, networking is constantly growing and changing, therefore we wanted to connect our readers with a networking pro, and her name is Jenny Powers.

We connected with Jenny to do a short Q&A, where she talks about her thoughts on networking, and gives us a look inside her networking event, “Running with Heels.”

Q: What sets “Running with Heels” apart from those traditional networking events?

We are a by-invitation community focused on curated connections. We strategically extend exclusive invitations to a diverse group of senior level women executives and established business owners from a variety of backgrounds, skill sets and interests in an effort to encourage the development of mutually beneficial professional and personal relationships. This is no business card exchange or speed networking event, we’re a get-together with friends and business partners you just haven’t met yet.

Q: What do you say to women who dislike or don’t see the benefits of networking events to get them to come join one with “Running with Heels?”

I tell them to give us a try because we produce women’s networking events for women who hate networking! Most people fall in that category so they give us a shot, realize that networking can actually be fun and productive and then they’re hooked!

Q: Not only are you having great success with “Running with Heels,” but you also get your voice out in your monthly column on DailyWorth.com and through your podcast, “BroadCast: Broads Building Business.” Can you tell us what you have found more challenging motherhood or work, and why? 

Without a doubt, motherhood is the most challenging job I’ve ever had however it’s also the most rewarding. Writing my column, producing events and interviewing guests for my show and having them open up to me are all a cinch compared to raising a healthy, happy, well-rounded child.

Q: What is one take away you make sure to do at a networking event when meeting new people?

I always ask people I meet how I can help them. Most people are surprised by this and think it’s a trick question because networking gets a bad rap. When people think of networking, they think of self-serving people relentlessly pitching their product or service in an attempt to close a deal or fill a quota. If you regard networking simply as opening a door rather than closing a sale, you’ll genuinely want to help people move forward with their own goals.

 

Special thanks to Jenny Powers for sitting down with us for this Q&A! To learn more about Running with Heels, take a look at the full site here!

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

Dinner Is Served – Vol. 2

Greetings, all!

We are happy to bring you the second installment of our monthly blog special, where BFC’s own, Courtney Bell Garvey, gives us a delicious new recipe for you to try. Enjoy!

Top of the mornin’ to ye - At least that’s what the Irish say. I know because my husband is from the West Coast of that beautiful, little country. To celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and my little sister’s birthday this year, I’m throwing a festive dinner party! On the menu we have:

Appetizer: Guinness cheddar cheese dip with pretzel bites  - after all, what is St. Patty’s without Guinness?

Main Dish: Corned beef

Side Dish: Colcannon (which is mashed potatoes mixed with cabbage, bacon, and scallions) and honey roasted carrots. The carrots have a little twist with the honey incorporated, but my husband loves roasted carrots and parsnips.

Dessert: To end this delicious meal, what else would we have but birthday cake, all washed down with some more Guinness and Magners – hard cider.

Check please! I hope luck is on your side for this fun-loving day. Slainte (Cheers)!

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Written by BFC’s own, Courtney Bell Garvey!

Bored Children, No More!

Greetings, all!

It seems like it’s getting harder and harder to find ways to keep children entertained these days. To get away from the TV screens that seem to follow us everywhere, we put together this impressive list of fun activities, so both you and your child can fight the power of boredom.

1. Go to the park, make friends!

2. Make a treasure hunt – get some paper, crayons, and map out the hunt and hide the treasures.

3. Go on a nature hike – pack a zip lock baggie and gather all the cool things you find on the hike, and then write about them when you get back home.

4. Make clean up a game! Sing a song and chart how much you cleaned up.

5. Schedule a play date.

6. Hit the library – see if they have reading corners scheduled, research some great books and find them at the library.

7. Create your own book – encourage the child to get super creative.

8. Dance party – get music and make up a dance.

9. Try out a new restaurant and pretend to be a food critic.

10. Play tourist for a day.

11. Make an obstacle course outside or inside if the space is big enough.

12. Play board games.

13. Go for an I SPY walk. Make a list of all items you need to find, take a camera and snap the photos.

14. Babysitting for girls? Create at home spa day.

15. Go pottery painting.

16. My favorite – build a fort. Use pillows, blankets, blocks, anything you can, and have the kids visit each other in the fort they build.

17. Make a collage of photos.

18. Cook or bake with the kids. Have them follow the recipe, read it out loud, teach them about measurements.

19. Chalk drawing outside on the sidewalks.

20. Build a town – with a banker, hotel, restaurant, and have each child run the shop. They will love it!

Special thanks to The Centsible Life and our Founder, Lindsay Bell, for the great ideas!

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

What Is a Birth Plan?

Greetings, all!

As I get closer to delivery, only three more weeks, my husband and I were advised by my OB to review a series of questions and what if scenarios. I found a detailed check list on The Bump to use as a template. But you have to keep in mind; plans don’t always go the way you envision. So play out a few different scenarios so you are not surprised or caught off guard!

Here are some interesting things they brought up that I didn’t really think about…

1. Do you want the lights bright or dimmed?

2. Do you want interns present from the birth?

3. How do you prefer to spend your first stage of labor? In a bath tub? Walking around? With music or in silence?

4. During delivery how do you want to be positioned? Stand, squat, lie in side, lean on partner…?

And here are some really important questions to ask…

1. Would you like labor augmentation? Do you even know what that is?

2. What kind of pain relief do you want to use? There are a lot of options.

3.  What level of fetal monitoring do you want?

4. After delivery what do you prefer? What do you want to do with the umbilical cord and placenta?

5. What if you have to have a c-section. Know your options. Read about recovery. You have decisions here too; want your partner there, want to see the baby come out via mirror?

Print out your plan and keep it in your hospital bag, it’ll just be a source of comfort!

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Written by our Founder and CEO,  Lindsay Bell!

Fun Family Event This Weekend: Really Ready to Read!

Greetings, all!

We wanted to bring our followers a very special event taking place this weekend at Society of Illustrators, that features Meredith Oppenheim and world-renowned psychologist Dr. Shefali Tsabary. At the event, you can learn about Conscious Parenting, a philosophy and bestselling book forwarded by HH The Dalai Lama, that revolutionizes the parenting journey and allows us to transform our relationship with our children.

Learn how Meredith put this philosophy into practice when the word games she and her daughter created inspired their self-published book Really Ready to Read, which generated over $10,000 on Kickstarter with proceeds going to early literacy charities.

Attendees can also look forward to literacy games, crafts, dance, music and more for children 4–8 years of age.

Event Information:
Time:
Sunday, March 6, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location:
  Society of Illustrators – 128 E. 63rd St (between Park & Lex)

Cost:  $30/adult and $5/child
To register for the event click here!

We hope many of you will be at this great event to learn more! And when you’re there, share photos from the event on our Facebook page, or tag @lindsaybellnyc on Twitter!

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!