Category Archives: BFC

How to Create Your Care Giver Bio

Greetings, all!

Need help creating a bio for your profile? Answer these questions and the write it out in paragraph form. Write it in FIRST person (see ex. below). Add anything that might be relevant and what makes you unique.  Be as concise as you can. LIMIT 200 WORDS MAX.

1. Where are you from?  Where do you live now?

2. How long have you lived in NYC or the surrounding area? Or when are you moving?

3. Did you go to college? Where? What degree/focus?

4.  What are you hobbies?

5. Childcare experience?

6. Youngest to oldest ages you have worked with? Preference?

7. Bilingual? Drive? Swim? Passport? Willing to travel? Can you tutor? What subjects?

8. What type of job are you looking for full-time/part-time/weekends? Live-in/live-out?

9. Are you good at organization, household management, personal assistant, etc.?

10. Experience with pets? Elderly people? Children with special needs? What kind?

11. Certifications? CNA, HHA, CPR/AED first aid? Baby nurse?

Bio Example:

I am originally from Baltimore, MA but currently live in Brooklyn, New York.  In 2009, I graduated with a BA in Psychology from NYU. I am a former swim instructor for the last eight years and have experience working with children with special needs. I have been babysitting for many years and have filled the role as a summer nanny. I’ve worked with kids ages infant to teen and am extremely confident in tutoring. My best subjects are math and science and I have also tutored kids for the SAT.  Additionally, I have office skills and am computer/tech savvy. I also love to cook and play board games.  I have a driver’s licenses and passport. I truly love children and am excited to find a nanny position where I can fully utilize my experience.  

Once completed, please e-mail your bio to: bookings@bellfamilycompany.com in the body of an e-mail or send it as a word doc attachment. If you are a BFC sitter or nanny, please upload it on your profile and let us know when it is complete!

What Is a Birth Plan?

Greetings, all!

As I get closer to delivery, only three more weeks, my husband and I were advised by my OB to review a series of questions and what if scenarios. I found a detailed check list on The Bump to use as a template. But you have to keep in mind; plans don’t always go the way you envision. So play out a few different scenarios so you are not surprised or caught off guard!

Here are some interesting things they brought up that I didn’t really think about…

1. Do you want the lights bright or dimmed?

2. Do you want interns present from the birth?

3. How do you prefer to spend your first stage of labor? In a bath tub? Walking around? With music or in silence?

4. During delivery how do you want to be positioned? Stand, squat, lie in side, lean on partner…?

And here are some really important questions to ask…

1. Would you like labor augmentation? Do you even know what that is?

2. What kind of pain relief do you want to use? There are a lot of options.

3.  What level of fetal monitoring do you want?

4. After delivery what do you prefer? What do you want to do with the umbilical cord and placenta?

5. What if you have to have a c-section. Know your options. Read about recovery. You have decisions here too; want your partner there, want to see the baby come out via mirror?

Print out your plan and keep it in your hospital bag, it’ll just be a source of comfort!

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Written by our Founder and CEO,  Lindsay Bell!

Winter Days in TriBeCa

Greetings, all!

In efforts to keep both you and the little ones entertained during these cold winter days, we rounded up some indoor activities near the TriBeCa neighborhood to check out! And if you were wondering, there’s only 31 days until Spring – but who’s counting?

1. Take a look at Macaroni Kid Downtown for their events calendar.

2. Don’t overestimate the power of Whole Foods.

3. Give a local library or book store a spin, and drop in for story time.

4. Bubby’s is a kid friendly restaurant -  and who doesn’t love doodling on their placemat?

5. Gymboree in Tribeca has open play! Just stop at the front desk, pay the small $20 fee, and it’s all yours for the whole time!

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Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell!

Nannyology: Three Types of Nannies

Greetings, all!

We bring you a special feature blog post this week, with the findings from Tammy Gold, author of “Secrets of the Nanny Whisperer” and founder of Gold Parent Coaching. She shares insight on how to understand the three types of nannies, so you can find the right match for your family.

Finding the right kind of nanny to match your particular work/life situation is critical in creating a calm and stress-free home. If you make the right nanny match, everyone is happy… but if you choose the wrong match, things can get ugly in a hurry. To avoid this unnecessary stress, I coach my clients to figure out what kind of nanny they need based upon the term “nannyology.” This refers to the process of understanding who nannies are, how they think and how they work. One part of nannyology is learning the three nanny responsibility types so moms can figure out which one best matches their needs.

The Three Nanny Personalities

After hearing hundreds of stories and mediating countless mom/nanny relationships, I started to notice three distinct personality types which I named: The Parental Unit Nanny, The Partner Nanny, and The Executor Nanny. Each of these types is distinguished by their level of autonomy and their ability to handle — or not handle — different kinds of responsibility. It’s important to know which one you’re looking to hire from the get-go, because all too often parents make the mistake of hiring one when they really need one of the others.

The Parental Unit Nanny

Parental Unit Nannies are proactive, motivated, in-charge and most importantly, capable of handling every single aspect of her job without help from the parents. They work best with parents who are actively looking for someone to take the lead in their absence and “just take care of it.” This type of nanny functions as the “parent in charge.” Parental Unit Nannies make it easy for their bosses to transition into “work mode” or “rest mode” because they know that everything at home is being handled perfectly. Parental Unit Nannies can run the entire home, manage all of the children’s’ activities, schedule play dates, get the putty for Bobby’s science experiment, take Ruby to the doctor when her cough sounds worse, talk to Ali’s teacher about the mean girl on the playground and have dinner on the table by 5pm. Of course even the greatest Parental Unit nannies need training in order to do the job well, but they are the type of nanny usually best suited to a full time working parents or moms who are really busy and need to clone themselves. It can be hard for a parental unit nanny to stay home all day and take directions when she is used to being in charge and on her own.

The Partner Nanny

The Partner Nanny is named for her ability to be the mom or primary caregiver’s partner. She can shift her duties and level of care based upon the needs of the mother. When mom is out, the Partner Nanny runs the show and she is able to keep the house and children moving along smoothly and steadily. When mom is home, the Partner Nanny does not necessarily step behind mother, but steps beside her completing household tasks in unison. A Partner Nanny is completely in-sync with mom and together side-by-side, tackling the care of the children and running the home. Being a Partner Nanny is challenging since it can be difficult to shift between being “the boss” and then just “the helper.” Nannies usually like to know they are one or the other and Partner Nannies need to be highly adaptable and carefully attuned to the needs of the mother. A Partner Nanny may take the older children to school, run to the store for new ballet shoes, take the baby to music class, and when mom returns, she may shift her focus to laundry, cooking and cleaning.

The Executor Nanny

The Executor Nanny carries out the parents’ directions. She is typically someone who works with an at-home mother or a mother who works on a part-time basis. In her role she would handle childcare, but rarely all on her own. She would also handle a great deal of house care since the mother is often home managing the children. An Executor Nanny could do everything from heavy cleaning, and cooking, to taking the baby for a walk and playing princess with the toddler. She typically would never be asked to run the home and the children’s activities on her own. These nannies usually watch one child while the mother is out with the other siblings or perhaps watching all of the children for short periods of time while mom might be out running errands, at the gym or on a work project. Her mindset is to “assist” and “execute” items set in motion by the mother — precisely the opposite of the more proactive Parental Unit Nanny who may be left to plan the entire week on her own.

The key to matching in any relationship, let alone this complex personal/professional relationship, is stating your wants and needs upfront. By understanding that “one nanny does not fit all” and knowing these three nanny personality types moms can find or train to create their ideal match!

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Written by Tammy Gold, Nanny Placement Director and Parenting Expert

A Kid’s Valentine’s Day

Greetings, all!

Are you looking to find ways to get the little ones involved in Valentine’s Day this year?  Well, you are in luck, because cupid over here is shooting some fun craft ideas your way! What better way to enjoy the zero degree temperatures this weekend than staying indoors and trying these out?

Your favorite friends for these crafts will be construction paper, scissors, glue, and maybe some googly eyes if you’re feeling adventurous.

1. Bee Mine by Crafty Morning

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2. Heart Garland by TeachWithMe

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3. Heart Shaped Animals by Crafty Morning

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4. Emoji Fever by Housing a Forest

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5. Minion Love by Housing a Forest

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

 

 

Your Pre-Labor Checklist

Greetings, all!

Getting close to labor and want to make sure you have everything complete? I was searching for a list that was simple, and I liked the recommendations from The Bump.

Here is a modified pre-baby check list:

1. Take a childbirth class
I found CPR, newborn/infant training, and practice breathing techniques the most helpful.

2. Know the breast feeding basics
Here are good 411 tips from CNN in this clip, or learn about nipple shields in this clip.

3. Get the crib and get the nursery in order
One word: Wayfair 

4. Pack your hospital bag - one for you and one for baby
I like this example provided by The Bump.

5. Select birth announcements
Mpix to the rescue!

6. Prep meals in advance or download delivery apps

7. Install car seat into car

8. Wash crib sheets and baby clothes
Get a good baby detergent.

9. Make a labor playlist
Pick music that soothes you.

10. Chose a pediatrician
Ask your OB, mom, friends, or research your own.

11. Spend QT with hubby
Schedule date nights and enjoy the peace and quiet.

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Written by our Founder, CEO, and soon to be mom, Lindsay Bell!

A New Kind of Job

Greetings, all!

As a new mom (or dad) one of the first big choices you have to make is whether or not you’ll be returning to work after your little one is born. For some this choice is easy, but for others you agonize over the “right” decision. In my case it was easy. I could NOT work. I was a teacher at a private school and the cost of child care far exceeded what I was making. I quickly found peace with the decision because it’s what we had to do.

I’ll be the first to admit that I did not fully understand what it took to be a stay-at-home mom. My mom did it for most of my childhood, and so did many others. I was very happy to be fortunate enough to stay home with Henry. Almost six months later, I can tell you that it has been awesome. I love being there when he wakes up, listening to him giggle all day long, taking him outside for fresh air, and so much more.

However, some days I find myself wishing I was back in a classroom. I loved my job. I was good at my job. I loved my students, colleagues, and even the parents! I long to talk to other adults, to actually sit down to eat lunch and have a few moments of relaxation, to take a shower where I can condition my hair AND shave my legs, and to wear nice clothes without the fear of being spit up on. I suppose “the grass is always greener!” I have to look at it as now I have a different kind of job that is equally as important. Instead of teaching multiplication, I play peek-a-boo. I read to Henry, we sing songs, and get in some gym and music time, too!  I find balance by tutoring former students a few times a week and getting a sitter once in a while to go work out or to dinner with my girlfriends. Balance is key! Whether you stay at home, work full or part time, being a parent is hard work! Finding the right balance is essential in order to maintain your sanity and happiness!

I asked my “Baby Mamas” how they came to the decision whether to stay home or go back to work. Their answers varied. Some didn’t have a choice and had to go back to work because they couldn’t afford to lose their income. Others wanted to go back to work and are enjoying being back in the work environment. One mom is back at work because her company pays for her fertility treatments. Another mom is a partner at a law firm with her husband and she balances work and motherhood by working from home a few days a week and bringing her son to work on others. All the situations are different, but they are all the right choice for their family. It’s not easy to be at home all the time and it’s not easy to leave your baby. Ultimately you have to do what is best financially, mentally, and logistically for your family.

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Written by Maureen Kruse, our past Chicago city coordinator.

Your Best Story Time

Greetings, all!

Having a good book to read during story time is no longer a chore to find. Thanks to Lucie’s List, we have an impressive list of children’s books to bring to your little one(s) of all ages.

So, dust off that rocking chair in the corner and scoop up one of these great books below for your next bed time read!

Toddlers

1. Hi (Animal Words) by Ethan Long
2. Maisy’s Digger by Lucy Cousins
3. What This Book Needs Is a Pig in a Wig by Emma J. Virjan
4. Wolfie the Bunny by Ame Dyckman
5. Llama Llama Gram and Grandpa by Anna Dewdney

Preschoolers

1. Who Done It? by Olivier Tallec
2. It’s Only Stanley by Jon Agee
3. Goodnight Already! by Jory John

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

Hotel and TravelSitter for the New Year

Greetings, all!

Did you know we book HotelSitters for our families in NYC, Brooklyn, Westchester, Connecticut, Chicago, Los Angeles or Miami?

If you have a family trip coming up, we also book TravelSitters to accompany your family, making it a real vacation for you and not just a re-location of your normal day-to-day! Our sitters have traveled with member families throughout the Caribbean, Florida, Europe, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, and most of the Rockies Ski resorts! We provide excellent vacation and holiday coverage so you and your family can have all the extra care and support needed for a restful vacation.

Bell Family’s Hospitality Program allows guests to participate in our trusted family care services!

We Offer In-Room/On-Site Care

We’ll come to your hotel to keep your children entertained!
- Make crafts and work on fun art projects
- Learn to sing and play guitar
- Play games, enjoy the on-site hotel services, or enjoy personal story time

Ask About Exploring the City and Mini-Day Camps

Our sitters will show up with an itinerary for the day!
- Organize shopping trips
- Plan destination visits
- Assist in pick-up/drop-offs
- Run last minute errands
- Lend an extra hand at local family events (weddings, parties, business functions, etc.)
- Refer the best places to go for kids

To download our release for your families click here! And to book a HotelSitter, e-mail
bookings@bellfamilycompany.com or call 212.265.3354.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Coordinator, Taylor Bell!

News and Advice for Families

Greetings, all!

Today we bring you news and advice for agencies and families from GTM’s Nanny Agency Advisor. We’ll take you through and answer questions regarding whether nanny’s should get flu shots, 2016 minimum wage changes, and finally some gift ideas for your nanny on those special occasions.

Should Nannies Get Flu Shots?

As temperatures fall, the risk of illness rises. This is the time of year that many physicians recommend getting the flu vaccine. But some household employees may not want to get it. Families might be concerned, especially with nannies, that someone spending so much close time with children is not vaccinated. Can household employers require flu shots for nannies?

Read more about best practices and legal guidance to share with your families about this issue.

2016 Minimum Wage Changes

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employers – including household employers – in all states must pay their employees at least the state’s minimum wage. This wage rate often changes at the beginning of a new year, so it’s important for families with domestic workers to make note of any changes and begin plans to increase an employee’s wage.

The following list shows the states that have 2016 minimum wage changes and when those changes are effective.

Gift Ideas for Nannies

Searching for the perfect gift for your nanny’s birthday, holiday, or just to show appreciation? This impressive list has 20 great gift ideas for special occasions such as these!

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Information provided by GTM Payroll Services.