All posts by Lindsay Bell

Training Thursday Vol. 7 – Swaddling

Welcome to volume seven of Bell Family’s video training series, where each Thursday we release a video to help coach sitters on an array of childcare topics.

This week we are featuring a training video on how to swaddle.

Swaddling is currently coached to new parents in most NYC hospitals. Swaddling starts when a baby is born, till approximately four months old. Swaddling’s purpose is to create a womb like experience for the baby to feel soothed. It’s important to make sure the cloth is not near the baby’s face – the cloth should be wrapped at the baby’s shoulders. Swaddling takes practice, so try it a few times by watching our video until you get it. Many swaddling blankets also have instruction on it. 

In a post published by The Bump, they talk about the best time to stop swaddling your baby.

“Parents and Caregivers should stop swaddling their babies by three or four months. At this time, most full-term infants are acclimated to life outside of the womb and no longer crave the constriction of a swaddle.”

Once the baby has reached the four month milestone, he/she takes to moving around in their sleep. Don’t be alarmed – this is good news, as it gives the baby exercise and helps them develop towards even greater milestones, such as crawling and walking.

For the full article on The Bump website, click here.

These videos are recommended to all BFC childcare providers to view for the latest techniques when caring for children. These videos were designed by our team comprised of long-time babysitters, full-time nannies, mothers, grandmothers, elementary educators, and social workers.

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Note: Always follow the family’s instruction and care methods, and keep the family informed of everything with their baby.  These videos are not required to view, but a simple recommendation. For more information or for questions, please contact our office or read our terms.

Children Vs. Night Terrors

It’s the middle of the night and your child wakes up calling out your name. You think they are suffering from a nightmare, but then you realize that nothing is working to help console your child. This is because your child is not suffering from a nightmare, but a night terror.

A night terror is different than a nightmare. When night terrors happen, most of the brain is asleep, but the small part that controls a child’s movement, voice, and expression actually remains awake. Because night terrors happen during non-REM sleep, parents can’t wake their child from the episode or console them.

With nightmares, parents can comfort their children by talking to them, hugging them, or turning on a light. Children usually remember nightmares the next morning, unlike night terrors.

To help prevent your child from night terrors, LULLY provides their audience with the Sleep Guardian 2. The Sleep Guardian 2 automatically vibrates to prevent night terrors before they start. It learns about your child’s sleep, and vibrates at just the right time. Then, its smart sensors detect when your child stirs, indicating it’s time to turn off. This means your child stays asleep, and you can too!

All information was gathered by LULLY.

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Consultant, Taylor Bell

Training Thursday Vol. 6 – Prepping for Outside

Welcome to volume six of Bell Family’s video training series, where each Thursday we release a video to help coach sitters on an array of childcare topics.

This week we are featuring a training video on how to prep children for the outdoors.

As it gets warmer outside, you’ll need to prepare for outside with the kids!

1. Pack your diaper bag/tote with essentials.
Water bottle or sippy cup, food/snacks, blanket to sit on, bib, sunscreen, wipes/sanitizer, hat for the child(ren), diapers, extra pair of clothes in case of blow-outs/spills.

2. Keep the kids in the shade as much as you can.
This is the best way to avoid sunburn, rashes, or the constant reapplication of sunscreen.

3. Keep yourself hydrated. 
It is important to take care of yourself, as you want to be healthy caring for kids.

4. Keep children away from pools, lakes, or any body of water.
If you are going swimming, make sure the child has the proper swim gear on and sunscreen. Never leave a child near water alone, even if the water is a few inches deep.

5. Be careful with ticks if you go hiking, walk through the woods, or go to the park.
Lyme disease is becoming more prevalent on the east coast. Ticks, which case Lyme disease are very small, and hard to see. Read more here.

Want more tips? Read here for summer safety tips from Parents Magazine.

These videos are recommended to all BFC childcare providers to view for the latest techniques when caring for children. These videos were designed by our team comprised of long-time babysitters, full-time nannies, mothers, grandmothers, elementary educators, and social workers.

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Note: Always follow the family’s instruction and care methods, and keep the family informed of everything with their baby.  These videos are not required to view, but a simple recommendation. For more information or for questions, please contact our office or read our terms.

Positive Affirmations to Inspire Mom

If your calendar alert didn’t go off reminding you that Mother’s Day is this Sunday, then consider this your official reminder.

Mother’s Day is a great time to remind moms everywhere how much they are valued, loved, and appreciated for all of the things they do. It’s important for moms to relax and reflect on all the joys motherhood brings, and appreciate the hard work they achieve each and every day.

With special thanks to Personal Creations, they provided a list of 52 Positive Affirmations to Inspire Mom, in a recent post on their website. This is a great read for moms, not only on Mother’s Day, but all days of the year! Personal Creations also provides some great printable pages to go along with the read.

Happy Mother’s Day to all of the moms out there!

“There’s no way to be a perfect mother and a million ways to be a good one.” Jill Churchill

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Written by our Marketing & Social Media Consultant, Taylor Bell

Training Thursday Vol. 5 – Soothing a Baby

Welcome to volume five of Bell Family’s video training series, where each Thursday we release a video to help coach sitters on an array of childcare topics.

This week we are featuring a training video on how to sooth a baby or calm a child tantrum. Always note, the first step is to follow the parent’s instruction on the method they prefer.

First, how to sooth a baby.

1. Rock the baby in a quiet space in your arms, or on a rocking chair.

2. Take the baby for a walk; give him or her a change of scenery and some fresh air.

3. Make a “shhhh” sound while rocking the baby; this creates a white noise sound.

 Second, help solve a child tantrum.

1. Redirect attention onto a new activity; get them excited about something else (game, picture, book, etc.).

2. Let them know it’s ok to be upset, but hitting is unacceptable.

3. Take the child out of the situation to give them space for a breather.

These videos are recommended to all BFC childcare providers to view for the latest techniques when caring for children. These videos were designed by our team comprised of long-time babysitters, full-time nannies, mothers, grandmothers, elementary educators, and social workers.

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Note: Always follow the family’s instruction and care methods, and keep the family informed of everything with their baby.  These videos are not required to view, but a simple recommendation. For more information or for questions, please contact our office or read our terms.

 

Our Favorite Toddler Books

Are you looking for a new read or two for your little one?

Thanks to my 14-month old son, Brooks, I’ve been influenced to buy about two dozen books, which has allowed me to collect some quality book reviews.

Below, you can find a short list of my son and I’s favorite books that have become apart of our bedtime routine.

1. Where is Baby’s Mommy? This was the first book I read to my son when he was a newborn, so it is sentimental to me. Every time I read to him I give him two options. If this book is ever one of the options, he always points to it! When the answer is no to the questions in the book, we shake our heads together.
2. Baby ABC. My toddler seems to be drawn to the contrast between color and black and white in this book. The photos of the babies are super cute, too.
3. Have You Ever Tickled a Tiger? Baby Brooks loves to touch and feel all the animals in this book. His favorite is the walrus whiskers.
4. The Wheels on the Bus. This book was from Brooks’ cousins. This song seems to be a go-to for toddlers. That and “Itsy, Bitsy Spider” never seem to fail. This book is also a sing-a-long and pop out!

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Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell

Training Thursday Vol. 4 – Kitchen Safety with Kids

Welcome to volume four of Bell Family’s video training series, where each Thursday we release a video to help coach sitters on an array of childcare topics.

This week we are featuring a training video on kitchen safety with kids!

The first bit of advice is to always follow the parent’s instruction on the family’s kitchen rules. The other advice is as follows:

1. Oven: Make sure the children are always kept away from the oven to ensure they don’t touch it, or pull down the handle. Even if it is not on, it’s good practice to keep them away from it.

2. Microwave: The general rule is to keep children away from it when it’s on. Pay special attention to those that are near the floor. If that is the case, keep the children away from it.

3. Outlets: All outlets should have stoppers, and even if the outlet has stoppers, still keep the children away from it. It’s not something they should play with. If you are at a place without stoppers, keep the children away, or block it with another object.

4. Cords: Cords should always be out of a child’s reach. The child could pull it down on themselves or wrap it around their body/neck causing strangulation.

5. Cleaning Supplies: If you need to clean something up, make sure you are not spraying bleach, or any other harmful chemical around the children. Use a green friendly cleaner to wipe up the mess. Also, make sure the cleaning supplies are far from the child’s reach at ALL times.

These videos are recommended to all BFC childcare providers to view for the latest techniques when caring for children. These videos were designed by our team comprised of long-time babysitters, full-time nannies, mothers, grandmothers, elementary educators, and social workers.

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Note: Always follow the family’s instruction and care methods, and keep the family informed of everything with their baby.  These videos are not required to view, but a simple recommendation. For more information or for questions, please contact our office or read our terms.

Training Thursday Vol. 3 – Snack Time

Welcome to volume three of Bell Family’s video training series, where each Thursday we release a video to help coach sitters on an array of childcare topics.

This week we are featuring a training video on snack time!

1. First and foremost, be cognizant of ANY and ALL food allergies. Always read ingredient labels and if you are still not certain, snap a photo of it with your phone and send to the parent to ask. Always ask if you are not 100% certain. If you see or sense an off reaction to a food, contact the parent immediately.

2. Solids typically start when the child is six months, usually in a pureed state (before six months babies digestive systems are not developed to digest solid foods). Some families make their own baby food in a food processor and some will buy baby food.

3. Once the baby is beyond pureed foods and ready for big boy/girl food, EVERYTHING needs to be chopped up in small pieces, so it’s easy to munch with their gums (as some babies don’t get teeth till 12-18 months).

4. Warning foods: grapes, blueberries, hotdogs, oranges – be wary of the casing – peel it off or chop up as much as possible.

5. Babies and children should sit in their highchair, booster, or chair at the table to keep messes in the kitchen. It’s a way for them to practice good eating habits at a table with the family.

6. For babies and toddlers use a bib, or for younger children, a placemat to keep their clothes and surrounding area as neat as possible.

7. Depending on the pediatrician, babies start drinking water around six months old. Follow the parents instruction on how much water the child should have throughout the day.

When heating foods, always test the food before you give it to a child to make sure the temperature is not too hot.

Every family has a different way of doing things. Always ask the family for full instruction on how they would like you to prepare foods.

If the child is not taking the food for some reason text the family and let them know. Always keep full records of how much the baby eats when in your care.

These videos are recommended to all BFC childcare providers to view for the latest techniques when caring for children. These videos were designed by our team comprised of long-time babysitters, full-time nannies, mothers, grandmothers, elementary educators, and social workers.

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Note: Always follow the family’s instruction and care methods, and keep the family informed of everything with their baby.  These videos are not required to view, but a simple recommendation. For more information or for questions, please contact our office or read our terms.

Simple Seven List of Parenting Go-To’s

Bell Family gets a lot of parenting tips, newsletters, event invites, must have product pushes… you name it, it has been thrown at us on a daily basis. As we are sure you like to stay informed (just not over informed), we pulled together a simple seven list of mom groups and newsletter sites that we have found helpful in staying updated with city pregnancy and parenting.

Checkout our list below, and let us know if you have any additions that you love!

Our simple seven list of parenting go-to’s:

1. Cardamom: It’s free to download the app, and you can see local moms to meet up for a playdate.
2. Upper East Side Moms (Facebook page): This is a free group to post anything related to motherhood.
3. Manhattan Mamas Meet Up (e-mail list): You can sign up here.
4. Working Moms of Manhattan Group: You can sign up here.
5. Stroller Traffic: A good site for city moms and newsletters.
6. Big City Moms: Started by two sisters and NYC moms, Big City Moms offers a lot of good events and meet-ups.
7. Well Rounded NYC: Offers urban parenting and modern pregnancy. I like their newsletter!

Written by our Founder & CEO, Lindsay Bell

Training Thursday Vol. 2 – Burping a Baby

Welcome to the second volume of Bell Family’s video training series, where each Thursday we release a video to help coach sitters on an array of childcare topics.

This week we are featuring a training video on how to burp a baby.

There are three basic ways to burp a baby:

1. Hold the baby facing you, upright, their body against your chest, and their head above your shoulder. Pat or rub their back gently.
2. Lay the baby face down across your knees with their head carefully supported. Pat or run their back gently.
3. Hold the baby on your knee in a sitting position. While leaning forward slightly, hold the baby’s jaw and pat or rub their back gently.

Every family has a different way of doing things, so always be sure to ask the family what their preferred method is. Whichever option you choose, remember this: keep the baby’s head higher than their butt, always support the head, and gentle patting or running is just as effective as (and less dangerous than) thumping hard.

Remember, some burps will bring liquid with them, so always have a burp cloth to protect yourself and your clothing.

Finally, keep in mind there is a difference between spit up and vomit. Spit up is essentially a wet burp that dribbles out of the baby’s mouth. Vomit involves a lot more fluid. If there is vomit or blood in the spit up, call the parent(s) right away!

These videos are recommended to all BFC childcare providers to view for the latest techniques when caring for children. These videos were designed by our team comprised of long-time babysitters, full-time nannies, mothers, grandmothers, elementary educators, and social workers.

Burping baby

Note: Always follow the family’s instruction and care methods, and keep the family informed of everything with their baby.  These videos are not required to view, but a simple recommendation. For more information or for questions, please contact our office or read our terms.